Matrix 31

IMG_1593.JPG
IMG_1593.JPG

Matrix 31

100.00

Being sold on behalf of Gillian Sewell.

In good condition.

Please select Matrix postage at checkout. If you purchase more than two editions we will contact you regarding postage.

The design of the dust-jacket was intended to suggest marionettes and their strings, the engraving had come to us a Christmas card. Elizabeth Grice nicely caught the flavour of Fleet Street in the 60s when, as one was going home, the mighty presses in the basements of the Mail and the Telegraph and elsewhere began slowly to revolve. Getting Bryan Maggs to write about his collaboration with Paul Getty in founding the Wormsley Library was indeed a coup for Matrix, and much of the credit must go to Bryan’s wife Bo, who also provided the psychedelic illustration. Peter Gauld’s New Basement Press has since 1996 produced a series of delightful and witty books, written and illustrated by him, recorded here for the first time. ‘Vacation in Vattis’ is Patrick’s account of the trip made by the Occasional Print Club to Vattis in Switzerland (‘the journey was spent dodging thawing ice bombs seeking a new home in the lake’) where Offizin Parnassia had one of the finest collections of Monotype equipment in the world, acquired from Harold Berliner [see Matrix 4, p. 54-56], with an insert printed in their Monotype Troy type. Barbara Henry wrote about her edition of Leaves of Grass and Walt Whitman’s involvement in the book’s typography. Martin Thomas wrote about Harry Carter’s forthright notes on various typefaces, giving us an excuse to use our own founts to illustrate them (‘Neo-Didot, an extremely ugly face’ [a particular favourite of ours, used occasionally in Matrix]). ‘From Bleeding Heart to Whittington’ shows four of Merlin Waterson’s wood-engravings of his travels, and a fifth, of Aleppo, was the subject of an attractive separate booklet that accompanied the special copies. In ‘Letterpress Adventures’ Andrew Anderson explains how he became involved with printing, and with Oliver Hill’s curiously inspirational menage at Daneway in Gloucestershire [see Matrix 10, pp. 35-9]; Judith Verity’s afterword begins: ‘It might be thought that I married Simon Verity, not only for his pretty name …’

Add To Cart